“Hemingway”: Film Review Podcast

Posted: April 8th, 2021 | Filed under: Film Reviews Podcast, Streaming, TV | No Comments »

15th July 1944: American writer and war correspondent Ernest Hemingway (1899 – 1961). Original Publication: Picture Post – 1748 – Hemingway Looks At The War In Europe – pub. 1944 (Photo by Kurt Hutton/Picture Post/Getty Images)

Such was the stature of Nobel Prize-winning author Ernest Hemingway in the 20th C, that the publication of his novels became must read events.

At least, among the literati.

Such is the stature of Ken Burns & Company, that the airing of a new documentary series on PBS is a must watch event.

And, now they’ve merged.

Now streaming at pbs.org, after airing Monday through Wednesday on PBS, is “Hemingway.”

The six hour, three part series, produced and directed by Lynn Novick and Burns, written by Geoffrey C. Wad, and and narrated as usual by Peter Coyote, delves into the interesting life and ways of Papa Hemingway.

Whatever you might think of Hemingway personally, or his writing, the tale is fascinating, well worth the watch.

For more insight, details and observations, including a few complaints, listen to my podcast below.

Audio MP3

“The Trial of the Chicago 7”: Film Review Podcast

Posted: November 5th, 2020 | Filed under: Cinema, Film Reviews Podcast, Streaming | No Comments »

Ever verbose, ever fascinating, ever political director/writer Aaron Sorkin is back it.

This time with a look back at “The Trial of the Chicago 7.”

It’s available for streaming on Netflix.

Though not a part of the Chicago protests during the ’68 Democratic convention, and the attendant turmoil, I was involved with Vietnam War protests — Smile at the FBI agents standing on the side, taking our photos — and the Civil Rights Movement. And all the other youth precipitated changes going on at the time.

It was an invigorating moment to be alive and of the age to be in the middle of it.

When he took office, Richard Nixon wanted to punish “the provocateurs” of the protests and violent skirmishes with Mayor Daley’s Chicago police.

The ensuing trial in Judge Julius Hoffman’s federal court turned into a circus.

I don’t know how great a flick Sorkin’s is, but, as someone who was of the time, I loved it.

The trial scenes are accurate, taken directly from the transcripts.

For more insight on the film and the time, listen to my podcast below.

 

Audio MP3